Subscriber Login

Forgotten your password?

You are looking at  91-94 of 94 chapters  for:

  • 15 Nomenclature x
Clear All

View:

Trivial Names  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.464
Item type: 
section
Drugs occasionally become known by an unofficial trivial name. The trivial name should be used in biomedical publications only to reproduce the exact language used as part of a study (eg, in a questionnaire), ... More

Uniform Labeling  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.502
Item type: 
section
The abbreviation ul (for uniformly labeled) may be used without expansion in parentheses: [14C]glucose (ul)Similarly, terms such as carrier-free, no carrier added, and carrier added may be used. In general ... More

Virus Nomenclature  

Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.527
Item type: 
section
Viruses evolve rapidly…. [A]denovirus, for example,may produce 250 000 DNA molecules in an infectedcell….  Leslie Collier and John Oxford(p12) Taxonomy lies at the uneasy interface betweenbiology and ... More

Vitamins and Related Compounds  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.472
Item type: 
section
The familiar letter names of most vitamins generally refer to the substances as found in food and in vivo. With the exception of vitamins A, E, and B complex, the INNs for vitamins given therapeutically ... More

View: