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Omissions in Verse

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.380
Item type: 
section
Use 1 line of em-spaced dots to indicate omission of a full line or several consecutive lines of verse.Sometimes you say it’s smaller. Today. . . . . . . you said it was a touch larger, and would change.   Marc ... More

Parentheses

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.352
Item type: 
section
Use parentheses to indicate supplementary explanations, identification, direction to the reader, or translation. (See also , Dashes, and , Brackets.)A known volume of fluid (100 mL) was injected. The ... More
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Parentheses and Brackets

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.149
Item type: 
section
Parentheses and brackets are internal punctuation marks used to set off material that is nonrestrictive or, as in the case of mathematical and chemical expressions, to alert the reader to the special ... More

Period

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.334
Item type: 
section
Periods are the most common end-of-sentence punctuation marks. Use a period at the end of a declarative or imperative sentence and at the end of each table footnote and each figure legend.Advances in ... More
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Period, Question Mark, Exclamation Point

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.145
Item type: 
section
…after journeying through the world of punctua-tion, and seeing what it can do, I am all the moreconvinced that we should fight like tigers to preserveour punctuation and we should start now.     Lynne ... More

Placement

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.359
Item type: 
section
Place closing quotation marks outside commas and periods, inside colons and semicolons. Place question marks, dashes, and exclamation points inside quotation marks only when they are part of the quoted ... More

Possessive of Compound Terms

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.371
Item type: 
section
Use 's after only the last word of a compound term. ...

Possessive Pronouns

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.370
Item type: 
section
Do not use 's with possessive pronouns: his, hers, ours, its, yours, theirs, whose.The idea was hers. Give the book its due.Note: Do not confuse the contraction of it is (it's) with the possessive its, ... More

Prime

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.375
Item type: 
section
Do not use an apostrophe where a prime sign is intended. Do not use a prime sign as a symbol of measurement. (See also , Nomenclature, Drugs, Chemical Names.)The methyl group was in the 5′ position. ... More
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Punctuation

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
eISBN: 
9780195382846
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.003.0008
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195176339
Periods, question marks, and exclamation points are the 3 end-of-sentence punctuation marks. Periods are the most common end-of-sentence punctuation marks. Use a period at the end of a declarative ... More

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