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Clichés  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.315
Item type: 
section
Clichés are worn-out expressions (sleep like a log, dead as a doornail, first and foremost, crystal clear). At one time they were clever metaphors, but overuse has left them lifeless, unable to conjure ... More
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Diction  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.136
Item type: 
section
Diction, or word choice, is important for any writing to be understood by its intended audience. In scientific writing, concrete and specific language is preferred over the abstract and general.Homonyms ... More

Euphemisms  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.314
Item type: 
section
Euphemisms (from the Greek eu, “good,” and pheme, “voice”) are indirect terms used to express something unpleasant. Although such language is often necessary in social situations (“He passed away.”), ... More

Homonyms  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.312
Item type: 
section
Homonyms are words that sound alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are easily confused, and computer spell-check programs are unable to differentiate them. Common examples ... More

Idioms, Colloquialisms, and Slang  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.313
Item type: 
section
Some language is best avoided in material written for a professional or academic audience.Idioms are fixed expressions that cannot be understood literally (kick the bucket, on a roll, put up with, pay ... More

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