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Pronouns  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.133
Item type: 
section
Pronouns replace nouns. In this replacement, the antecedent must be clear and the pronoun must agree with the antecedent in number and gender.Note: The possessive pronoun its should not be confused with ... More

Relative Pronouns  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.299
Item type: 
section
Relative pronouns (who, whom, whose, that, and which) introduce a qualifying clause.Who is used as a subject and whom as an object. The examples below illustrate correct usage.Give the award to whomever ... More
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Sentence Fragments  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.137
Item type: 
section
A sentence must have at minimum a subject and a verb; it also usually contains modifiers. Sentence fragments, which lack a subject or a verb, should not be used in scientific or technical writing (except ... More

Series or Comparisons  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.319
Item type: 
section
Parallel construction may also present a series or make comparisons. In these usages, the elements of the series or of the comparison should be parallel structures, eg, nouns with nouns, prepositional ... More

Shift in Number of Subject and Resultant Subject-Verb Disagreement  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.328
Item type: 
section
In elliptical constructions involving the verb (ie, the second verb is omitted because it is understood), if the number of the subject changes, the construction is incorrect. ...

Split Infinitives and Verb Phrases  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.306
Item type: 
section
Although some authorities may still advise the avoidance of split infinitives, this proscription a holdover from Latin grammar, wherein the infinitive is a single word and cannot be split has been relaxed. ... More

Subject and Predicate Noun Differ in Number  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.329
Item type: 
section
The predicate noun is the complement of a subject; it identifies, describes, or renames the subject. When the subject and predicate noun differ in number, follow the number of the subject in selecting ... More

Subject-Complement Agreement  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.296
Item type: 
section
Subjects and complements should agree in number.The child can take off his own shoes. We asked trial participants to return their pill dispensers.However, when the complement is shared by all constituents ... More
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Subject-Verb Agreement  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.139
Item type: 
section
The subject and verb must agree in number; use a singular subject with a singular verb and a plural subject with a plural verb. Unfortunately, this simple rule is often violated, especially in complex ... More

Tense  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.304
Item type: 
section
Tense indicates the time relation of a verb: present (I am), past (I was), future (I will be), present perfect (I have been), past perfect (I had been), and future perfect (I will have been). It is important ... More

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