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Drugs  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.226
Item type: 
section
Physicians and other health care professionals, patients, researchers, manufacturers, and the public may refer to drugs by several names, including the nonproprietary name (often referred to as the generic ... More

Trivial Names  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.464
Item type: 
section
Drugs occasionally become known by an unofficial trivial name. The trivial name should be used in biomedical publications only to reproduce the exact language used as part of a study (eg, in a questionnaire), ... More

Multiple-Drug Regimens  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.469
Item type: 
section
Regimens that include multiple drugs may be referred to by an abbreviation after the nonproprietary names of the drugs have been provided at first mention (see also , Drug Abbreviations, and , Abbreviations, ... More

Nomenclature for Biological Products  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.471
Item type: 
section
Several categories of drugs are identical to or derived from biological products. Some hormones given as drugs, for example, require special mention because the drug name differs from the name used for ... More

Vitamins and Related Compounds  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.472
Item type: 
section
The familiar letter names of most vitamins generally refer to the substances as found in food and in vivo. With the exception of vitamins A, E, and B complex, the INNs for vitamins given therapeutically ... More

Herbals and Dietary Supplements  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.473
Item type: 
section
Herbals and dietary supplements do not receive INNs, and they are not regulated as drugs in many countries, including the United States (as mandated by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, ... More

The Drug Development and Approval Process  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.459
Item type: 
section
This brief summary of the drug development process is provided to help define the origins of different names used to identify drugs. Drugs intended for clinical use undergo several phases of development ... More

Nonproprietary Names  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.460
Item type: 
section
The INN identifies a specific pharmaceutical substance or active pharmaceutical ingredient. The INN is in the public domain and can be used without restriction. It is sometimes referred to colloquially ... More

Proprietary Names  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.461
Item type: 
section
The manufacturer’s name for a drug (or other product) is called a proprietary name or brand name.(p15) Proprietary names use initial capitals, with a few exceptions (eg, pHisoHex). JAMA and the Archives ... More

Chemical Names  

Margaret A. Winker

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.462
Item type: 
section
The chemical name describes a drug in terms of its chemical structure.(p9) Chemical names are provided in the American Chemical Society’s Chemical Abstracts (information available at http://www.cas.org/PRINTED/printca.html) ... More

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