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Alphabetization and Sorting  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.413
Item type: 
section
Alphabetization in indexes begins with the first letter of the term, eg, G period G phase G protein Commas precede letters in sorting order (examples from Thomas).cold, common cold agglutinin disease ... More

Consistency  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.414
Item type: 
section
A text may not be consistent in style for particular terms, eg, italics or hyphens, but the index should be stylistically consistent. If no style predominates for a given term used throughout the text, ... More

Letter-by-Letter vs Word-by-Word  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.415
Item type: 
section
These are 2 styles of alphabetization. Letter-by-letter considers all letters of the entire entry, ignoring spaces between words. Word-by-word sorts by the first word of an entry term, then the next word. ... More

Capitalization of Main Entries  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.416
Item type: 
section
Although main entries have traditionally featured initial capitals to distinguish them from subentries, The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, recommends lowercase, except when the entry term would ... More

Abbreviations  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.417
Item type: 
section
Include only abbreviations used in the text being indexed (ie, if a text uses only an expanded form, eg, National Institutes of Health, but never the abbreviation, do not include “NIH” in the index). ... More

Locators  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.418
Item type: 
section
Locators are the citations commonly, page numbers in print indexes that follow the entry to indicate where the material about that entry is found. Locators may also be paragraph numbers, line numbers, ... More

Indented vs Run-in Style  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.419
Item type: 
section
In indented style, main headings are followed by indented subheadings, each on its own line. In run-in style, subheadings appear continuously, not on separate lines, and are separated by commas.Indented: ... More

Types of Index  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.420
Item type: 
section
A single index is the most convenient for the reader. However, separate author and subject indexes are common in biomedical publications, especially journals. Separate indexes should be “visually distinct”(p757) ... More

Cross-references  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.421
Item type: 
section
Cross-references are valuable for terms that readers might seek in different alphabetic locations (last example from Thomas).cDNA. See under DNA DNA dsDNA. See under DNA mtDNA. See under DNA DNA, 5, 300 ... More

Generic Cross-references  

Bruce McGregor and Harriet S. Meyer

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.422
Item type: 
section
General classes, and specific members of a class, may require generic cross-references, ie, a cross-reference to a group of entries rather than to specific entries by name. The following examples are ... More

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