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Grammar  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
eISBN: 
9780195382846
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.003.0007
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780195176339
A clear understanding of grammar is basic to good writing. Many excellent grammar books provide a detailed discussion of specific principles (see 25.3, Resources, General Style and Usage). In ... More
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Nouns  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.132
Item type: 
section
Nouns (words that name a person, place, thing, or idea) may serve as subjects or objects. | Although in English nouns can be used as modifiers, overuse of noun modifiers can lead to a lack of clarity. ... More
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Pronouns  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.133
Item type: 
section
Pronouns replace nouns. In this replacement, the antecedent must be clear and the pronoun must agree with the antecedent in number and gender.Note: The possessive pronoun its should not be confused with ... More
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Verbs  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.134
Item type: 
section
Verbs express an action, an occurrence, or a mode of being. They have voice, mood, and tense. | In the active voice, the subject does the acting; in the passive voice, the subject is acted on. In general, ... More

Modifiers (Noun Strings)  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.294
Item type: 
section
Although in English nouns can be used as modifiers, overuse of noun modifiers can lead to a lack of clarity. Purists may demand stricter rules on usage, but, as with the use of nouns as verbs (see , Correct ... More

Subject-Complement Agreement  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.296
Item type: 
section
Subjects and complements should agree in number.The child can take off his own shoes. We asked trial participants to return their pill dispensers. However, when the complement is shared by all constituents ... More

Personal Pronouns  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.298
Item type: 
section
Care must be taken to use the correct case of personal pronouns: subjective (the pronoun is the subject of the phrase or clause) or objective (the pronoun is the object of the phrase or clause).She was ... More

Relative Pronouns  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.299
Item type: 
section
Relative pronouns (who, whom, whose, that, and which) introduce a qualifying clause. Who is used as a subject and whom as an object. The examples below illustrate correct usage.Give the award to whomever ... More

Voice  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.302
Item type: 
section
In the active voice, the subject does the acting; in the passive voice, the subject is acted on. In general, authors should use the active voice, except in instances in which the actor is unknown or the ... More

Mood  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.303
Item type: 
section
Verbs may have 1 of 3 moods: (1) the indicative (the most common; used for ordinary objective statements), (2) the imperative (used for requesting or commanding), and (3) the subjunctive. Subjunctive ... More

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