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Clichés  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.315
Item type: 
section
Clichés are worn-out expressions (sleep like a log, dead as a doornail, first and foremost, crystal clear). At one time they were clever metaphors, but overuse has left them lifeless, unable to conjure ... More

Collective Nouns  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.326
Item type: 
section
A collective noun is one that names more than 1 person, place, or thing. When the group is regarded as a unit, the singular verb is the appropriate choice. (See also , Plurals, Collective Nouns.)The couple ... More

Compound Subject  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.327
Item type: 
section
When 2 words or 2 groups of words, usually joined by and or or, are the subject of the sentence, either the singular or plural verb form may be appropriate, depending on whether the words joined are singular ... More

Contractions  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.307
Item type: 
section
A contraction consists of 2 words combined by omitting 1 or more letters (eg, can't, aren't). An apostrophe shows where the omission has occurred. Contractions are usually avoided in formal writing. ... More

Correlative Conjunctions.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.317
Item type: 
section
Parallelism may rely on accepted cues (either/or, neither/nor, not only/but also, both/and). All elements of the parallelism that appear on one side of the coordinating conjunction should match corresponding ... More
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Diction  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.021.136
Item type: 
section
Diction, or word choice, is important for any writing to be understood by its intended audience. In scientific writing, concrete and specific language is preferred over the abstract and general.Homonyms ... More

Double Negatives  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.305
Item type: 
section
Two negatives used together in a sentence constitute a double negative. The use of a double negative to express a positive is acceptable, although it yields a weaker affirmative than the simpler positive ... More

Elliptical Comparisons  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.318
Item type: 
section
The conjunction than often introduces an abridged expression (eg, “You are younger than I [am young]).” Correct placement of than is important to avoid ambiguity: ...

Euphemisms  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.314
Item type: 
section
Euphemisms (from the Greek eu, “good,” and pheme, “voice”) are indirect terms used to express something unpleasant. Although such language is often necessary in social situations (“He passed away.”), ... More

Every and Many a  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.330
Item type: 
section
When every or many a is used before a word or series of words, use the singular verb form.Many a clinician does not understand statistics. (But, better yet: Many clinicians do not understand statistics.) ... More

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