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  • 21.4 Exponents x
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Fractional Exponents vs Radicals

Stephen J. Lurie

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.609
Item type: 
section
Use of radicals may sometimes be avoided by substituting a fractional exponent: (a2−b2)1/2instead of a2−b2.As with unstacking fractions, if clarity is sacrificed by making the equation fit within the ... More
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Logarithmic Expressions

Stephen J. Lurie

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.611
Item type: 
section
The term log is an abbreviation of logarithm. A system of logarithms may be based on any number, although logarithmic systems based on the numbers 10, 2, and the irrational number e are most common. The ... More
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Negative Exponents

Stephen J. Lurie

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (10th edition)

Print Publication Year: 
2007
Published Online: 
2009
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780195176339.022.610
Item type: 
section
A negative exponent denotes the reciprocal of the expression, as illustrated in these examples: x−n= 1/xn A−1 = 1/A B−2 = 1/B2A negative exponent may simplify some expressions within running text:A(x+y)2 may also be written  as  A(x+y)-2 or A/(x+y)2 ... More

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