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Electronic Text Editing

Chapter:
Manuscript Editing and Proofreading
Author(s):

Stacy Christiansen

Electronic Text Editing

Many word processing programs have text editing functionality that allows users to view edits and track changes. It is common for insertions to be underlined and deletions to be struck through. Each program offers tools to show or hide the editing marks, notes about formatting, and embedded comments. How reviewers respond to the editing depends not only on the word processing program but also on the technologies and workflow involved. For example, manuscript editors at JAMA send authors edited manuscripts as PDF files showing text insertions and deletions as well as embedded comments and questions. Authors can respond by using advanced editing tools directly on the PDF, by printing out and marking up the copy and returning via fax, or by outlining corrections and query answers in an e-mail message.

When manuscript editing is performed electronically, often the editor inserts codes into the electronic file that allow the file to be automatically typeset for initial placement of elements (eg, title, abstract, text, tables, figures, reference list). The coding also allows the content to undergo conversion to another language (eg, HTML or SGML) for publication online. These codes may or may not appear on the edited typescript. The examples below illustrate the same passage of text with the codes hidden and then revealed after the file is run through a process to convert the text to XML code:

In a large cohort of consecutive patients undergoing drug-eluting stent implantation, we noted a 9-month cumulative stent thrombosis incidence of 1.3%, substantially higher than rates reported in major clinical trials (0.4% at 1 year for sirolimus and 0.6% at 9 months for paclitaxel).3,5 With widespread availability of drug-eluting stents, the scope of percutaneous coronary intervention has been expanded to more complex lesions and patients. In our study, 26% of the population had diabetes and 78% of the lesions were complex. The clinical consequences of stent thrombosis were severe, with a case-fatality rate of 45%.

<para>In a large cohort of consecutive patients undergoing drug-eluting stent implantation, we noted a 9-month cumulative stent thrombosis incidence of 1.3%, substantially higher than rates reported in major clinical trials (0.4% at 1 year for sirolimus and 0.6% at 9 months for paclitaxel). <reflink idref=“ref-jbr50003-3 ref-jbr50003-5”/> With widespread availability of drug-eluting stents, the scope of percutaneous coronary intervention has been expanded to more complex lesions and patients. In our study, 26% of the population had diabetes and 78% of the lesions were complex. The clinical consequences of stent thrombosis were severe, with a case-fatality rate of 45%.</para>

The examples below illustrate the coding/tagging behind an edited, linked JAMA reference. The first paragraph is what the author would see; the second illustrates all the codes behind the tagging.

<jrn>1. Iakovou I, Schmidt T, Bonizzoni E, et al. Incidence, predictors, and outcome of thrombosis after successful implantation of drug-eluting stents. JAMA. 2005;293(17):2126-2130. Medline:15870416</jrn>

<refitem id=“ref-jle50384–1”><author><first></first><last>Iakovou</last></author><author><first></first><last>Schmidt</last></author><author><first>E</first><last>Bonizzoni</last></author><etal></etal><title>Incidence, predictors, and outcome of thrombosis after successful implantation of drug-eluting stents.</title><jrnlname>JAMA</jrnlname><refcitation><year>2005</year><volume>293</volume><issueno>17</issueno><fpage>2126</fpage><lpage>2130</lpage></refcitation><pmid>15870416</pmid></refitem>

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