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Abbreviating Number.  

Edward H. Livingston

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0018.021.0007
Item type: 
section
The word number may be abbreviated No. in the body of tables and line art or in the text when used as a specific designator. Do not use the number sign (#) in place of the abbreviation; this could be confused with the hashtag (#) used in social media. The word ...

Abbreviations  

Brenda Gregoline

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
eISBN: 
9780197507827
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0013
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190246556
The Abbreviations chapter of the 11th edition of the AMA Manual of Style begins by distinguishing between abbreviations, acronyms, and initialisms and cautions against overuse of ... More

Abbreviations.  

Brenda Gregoline

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0013.021.0037
Item type: 
section
To the Editor.—It seems to me that at the time that there are articles being considered (ABC), dutifully edited (DE), and found good (FG) for publication, an editor may show hesitation to interfere judiciously (HIJ), perhaps because he thinks his knowledge lacking (KL) compared with that of eminent members of national organizations (MNO), and, therefore, for the sake of peace, quiet, and restraint (PQR), he sets the text in unaltered version (STUV), thus failing to act the wise xenogogue (WX) and meekly accepting the yoke of zeitgeist (YZ)....

Abbreviations.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0087
Item type: 
section
Table 14.6-2 lists some common abbreviations from pulmonary function testing; they should always be expanded at first mention. Previous | Next

Abbreviations.  

Brenda Gregoline

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0009.021.0007
Item type: 
section
For most all-capital abbreviations, the plural is formed by adding a lowercase s. Do not use an apostrophe before the s (see 8.7.5, Using Apostrophes to Form Plurals). Note: When plural all-capital abbreviations are found in an all-capital setting, such as a heading, the plural ...

Abbreviations.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0002.022.0312
Item type: 
section
Avoid the use of abbreviations in the title and subtitle, unless space considerations require an exception or unless the title or subtitle includes the name of an entity or a group that is best known by its acronym. In both cases, the abbreviation should be expanded in the abstract and at the first appearance in the text (...

Abbreviations.  

Lauren Fischer and Paul Frank

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0017.022.0013
Item type: 
section
Most units of measure are abbreviated when used with numerals or in a virgule construction. Certain units of measure should be spelled out at first mention, with the abbreviated form in parentheses. Thereafter, the abbreviated form should be used in text (see 14.12, Units of Measure)....

Abbreviations.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0135
Item type: 
section
Within the body of the table and in column and row headings, units of measure and numbers normally spelled out may be abbreviated for space considerations (see 13.12, Abbreviations, Units of Measure; 17.0, Units of Measure; and 18.0, Numbers and Percentages). However, spelled-out words should not be combined with abbreviations for units of measure. For example, “First Week” or “1st wk” or “Week 1” may be used as a column heading, but not “First wk.” Abbreviations or acronyms (but not abbreviations used to indicate units of measure) should be explained in a footnote (...

Abstract.  

Edward H. Livingston

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0019.022.0002
Item type: 
section
Many readers will read only the abstract of a research article, so it should include as precise a summary of the content as possible. In addition, because readers may decide to review the entire article based on information in the abstract, it should be well written and carefully constructed....

Abstract.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0002.021.0037
Item type: 
section
In this age of electronic data dissemination and retrieval, in which abstracts are indexed and freely available, a well-written abstract is important in directing readers to articles of potential clinical and research interest and also for discoverability via online searching. The abstract of a research report summarizes the main points of an article: (1) the study objective or importance, (2) the study design and methods, (3) the primary results, and (4) the principal conclusions. Some journals may include funding at the end of the abstract or in the Methods section; others, like the JAMA Network journals, include this information in the Acknowledgment section (...