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Editing With XML.  

Stacy L. Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0021.022.0002
Item type: 
section
XML (extensible markup language) is both machine and human readable, creating a structure and avenue for data exchange, transformation, and reuse. It provides rules for naming and defining parts of a document and their relationship with each other.1 XML uses tags in start-end pairs (such as <title>Title of the Article</title> and <body> </body>) to define the elements in that piece of content. In XML, all the content is enclosed with tags that identify what the data are (eg, the article’s title is tagged <title>Title of Article</title>). The tagged content can be validated using a schema or DTD (document-type definition). The DTD defines the overall structure of content and helps ensure consistency across documents. For example, the JAMA Network journals use a DTD based on the National Library of Medicine (NLM) DTD, which is endorsed by the National Information Standards Organization....

Electronic Editing.  

Stacy L. Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0021.021.0001
Item type: 
section
Publishers and editors need to be cognizant of the various modes of delivery of their content (digital and/or print) and how the content will be used; they should then customize their processes accordingly.1 Many have discovered the benefits of having both print and digital products derived from a single source, which minimizes the possibility of discordant versions and allows for publication to different outputs quickly and accurately....

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