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Access to Data Requirement.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0194
Item type: 
section
For all reports, regardless of funding source, that contain original data (research and systematic reviews), at least 1 named author should indicate that she or he “had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis”...

Access to Data Statement.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0170
Item type: 
section
The ICMJE recommends that journals ask authors whether they “had access to the study data, with an explanation of the nature and extent of access, including whether access is on-going.”9 Consistent with this recommendation, the JAMA Network journals require at least 1 named author (eg, the principal investigator), and preferably no more than 2 authors, to indicate that she or he had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis for all reports that contain original data (eg, research articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses). This information should be published in the Acknowledgment section (...

Acknowledging Manuscript Receipt.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0241
Item type: 
section
Journals should send a notice to authors to acknowledge receipt of their manuscripts and provide names and contact information of relevant editorial staff. Acknowledgment letters may be sent automatically from manuscript submission systems, usually after an author has viewed the submission and confirmed that it is complete....

Acknowledging Support, Assistance, and Contributions of Those Who Are Not Authors.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0166
Item type: 
section
In the Acknowledgment, authors identify important sources of financial and material support and assistance and give credit to all persons who have made substantial contributions to the work but who are not authors.1 , 2 Contributions commonly recognized in the Acknowledgment section include the following:...

Acknowledgment Elements and Order of Elements.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0173
Item type: 
section
An example of the Acknowledgment section, including all possible elements, as it would appear in the JAMA Network journals is shown in Box 5.2-1. In print or PDF versions of journal articles, author affiliations and correspondence information typically are published on the title page (or first page) of an article. However, in some cases (eg, articles with lengthy abstracts and author bylines) and in some journals (due to design considerations), there may not be sufficient room for all this information, and it may be published in the Acknowledgment section at the end of the article with a note indicating such on the first page of the article. Online, the author information and Acknowledgment section usually appear at the end of the article before the reference list and may be hyperlinked from the list of authors at the beginning of the article. These sections have various names, such as Acknowledgment, Article Information, and Endnotes....

Acknowledgments.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.021.0076
Item type: 
section
If you wish your merit to be known, acknowledge that of other people. Proverb In scientific publication, Acknowledgments typically are used to list grant or funding support, donors of equipment or supplies, technical assistance, and important specific contributions from individuals who do not qualify for authorship (...

Advertisements, Advertorials, Sponsorship, Supplements, Reprints, and e-Prints.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.021.0086
Item type: 
section
Regardless of platform or format, the difference between editorial content and marketing messages should be clear to the average reader. American Society of Magazine Editors 1 Commercial activities, such as advertising, sponsorship, reprints, and e-prints, provide a major source of revenue for many scientific publications. With this revenue, publications can offset some of the costs of journal operations, production, and distribution; may be able to set lower subscription rates than would otherwise be possible; and can serve as a source of income for the journal’s owner. Thus, some editors and publishers consider advertising a financial necessity. From a financial perspective, generating revenue is an important goal of advertisers, publishers, and editors—advertisers want to sell more products, publishers want to increase journal revenue, and editors want their journals to remain financially viable and sustainable. However, editors have a larger ethical responsibility to their readers, who must be able to rely on the editor to ensure that the journal’s integrity remains intact and that the information contained in the publication is valid and objective. This responsibility includes ensuring that advertising does not influence editorial decisions or content and having policies and procedures in place that prevent such influence....

Advertisements.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0255
Item type: 
section
Advertisements appear in print and online journals, email alerts, other online products and services, apps, and other types of media (such as podcasts and blogs). For biomedical publications, advertisements typically include the following: ■ Advertisements that promote professional or trade-related products (primarily pharmaceuticals and medical equipment in biomedical publications), services, educational opportunities or products, or announcements (...

Advertising and Sponsorship in Online Publications.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0260
Item type: 
section
Online ads are not restricted by the physical limits of a printed page. For example, an advertiser or content user can increase the type size of the prescribing information that appears in small type in an online pharmaceutical ad. Ads can rotate, expand, be animated, or pop up on or float into a screen with or without the user’s initiated action. An ad for a particular drug, product, or service can be hyperlinked to the manufacturer or provider’s website. In addition, ads can be targeted for specific users or a specific user experience. Online publication and technologic innovation have challenged the traditional print-based standards that separate advertising and editorial content. However, the general principles for protecting editorial integrity of print publications apply to advertising in online publications and other electronic products, such as websites, email, audio and video recordings, apps, social media and blogs, and online databases, especially for publications in clinical and health-related fields....

Advertorials.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0257
Item type: 
section
An advertorial is an advertisement that imitates editorial content or presents content in an editorial-like format, such as using text, tables, or figures in a manner similar to the journal’s editorial content. During the early 1990s, following a decline in the biomedical advertising market, advertorials became more common. The ASME principles state: “Regardless of platform or format, the difference between editorial content and marketing messages should ...

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