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Chemical Names.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0026
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section
The chemical name describes a drug in terms of its chemical structure.1 (pp15-16) Chemical names are provided in the American Chemical Society’s Chemical Abstracts (https://www.cas.org/) and can be listed in 1 of 2 ways; the first reflects the way in which Chemical Abstracts...

Code Designations.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0027
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section
A code designation is a temporary designation assigned to a product by the institution or manufacturer and may be used to refer to a drug under development before a nonproprietary name has been assigned. Codes may be numeric, alphabetic, or alphanumeric; letters in alphanumeric codes designate the institution or manufacturer assigning the code designation of the drug and are followed by numbers to designate the chemical compound....

Combination Products.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0031
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section
For combination products (mixtures), the names of the active ingredients should be provided. The proprietary name of the combination may be given in parentheses if necessary to clarify the product to which the article refers. pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and triprolidine hydrochloride (Actifed) povidone and hydroxyethylcellulose (Adsorbotear)...

Drug Abbreviations.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0034
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section
Some drugs have commonly used abbreviations, such as INH for isoniazid and TMP for trimethoprim. However, abbreviations may be used inconsistently, be confused with other terms, or be unfamiliar to some readers. Because of the potential for harm from erroneous interpretation of abbreviated drug names, abbreviations should not be used except in rare instances (eg, ...

The Drug Development and Approval Process.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0023
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section
This brief summary of the drug development process is provided to help define the origins of different names used to identify drugs. Drugs intended for clinical use undergo several phases of development before they can be considered for human use. Animal studies are performed initially to assess pharmacologic and toxicologic effects. While clinical studies are being conducted, animal studies may continue to assess effects on reproduction, teratogenicity, and carcinogenicity....

Drug Preparation Names That Include a Percentage.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0032
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section
Some drug names, such as those used in topical preparations, include the percentage of active drug contained in the preparation. In these cases, the percentage should be listed after the drug name. The patient was treated with adapalene, 1%. Metronidazole lotion, 0.75%, was applied twice a day....

Drugs With Inactive Components.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
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Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0029
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Many drugs contain a pharmacologically inactive component (eg, a base, salt, or ester) that is not responsible for the drug's mechanism of action but lends stability or other properties to the drug. Drugs with both an active and inactive component generally require a 2-part name that provides the active and inactive portion of the drug. Inorganic salts and simple organic acids are named in the order cation-anion (eg, sodium chloride, magnesium citrate). For more complex organic compounds, the active component is named first (eg, oxacillin sodium)....

Drugs.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.021.0006
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section
Physicians and other health care professionals, patients, researchers, manufacturers, and the public may refer to drugs by several names, including the nonproprietary name (often referred to as the generic name) and at least 1 proprietary (brand) or trademark name selected by the manufacturer of the drug. Other drug identifiers include chemical names, trivial (unofficial) names, and code designations....

Herbal and Dietary Supplements.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0037
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section
Herbal and dietary supplements do not receive nonproprietary names, and they are not regulated as drugs in many countries, including the US (as mandated by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, passed in 199413). The US Congress has defined a dietary supplement as...

Multiple-Drug Regimens.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0033
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section
Regimens that include multiple drugs may be referred to by an abbreviation after the nonproprietary names of the drugs have been provided at first mention (see 14.4.12, Drug Abbreviations, and 13.11, Clinical, Technical, and Other Common Terms). Drug regimens used in oncology frequently are referred to by abbreviations of combinations of antineoplastic agents, but often the abbreviations are not derived from the nonproprietary names. For example, the letter ...

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