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Elements.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0059
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section
An isotope referred to as an element rather than as part of the name of a chemical compound may be described at first mention by providing the name of the element spelled out followed by the isotope number in the same typeface and type size (no hyphen, subscript, or superscript is used). The element abbreviation may be listed in parentheses at first mention and used thereafter in the article, with the isotope number preceding the element symbol as a superscript....

Hydrogen Isotopes.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0064
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Two isotopes of hydrogen have their own specific names, deuterium and tritium, which should be used instead of hydrogen 2 and hydrogen 3, respectively. In text, the specific names are also preferred to the symbols 2H or D (for deuterium, which is stable) and ...

Isotopes.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.021.0016
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section
Isotopes may be referred to in the medical literature alone or as a component of a radiopharmaceutical administered for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. The nomenclature for the isotopes incorporated in radiopharmaceuticals follows the international nonproprietary name (INN) drug nomenclature and therefore differs from that of isotopes that occur in elements alone....

Metastable Isotopes.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0065
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The abbreviation m, as in krypton Kr 81m or technetium Tc 99m, stands for metastable. The abbreviation should never be deleted because the term without the m designates a different radionuclide isomer. Previous | Next Principal Author: Cheryl Iverson, MA Thanks to Stephanie C. Shubat, MS, USAN Program, American Medical Association, Chicago, Illinois, for reviewing and providing comments....

Radiopharmaceutical Compounds Without Approved Names.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
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Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0061
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Compounds may be combined with radioisotopes for research purposes. Such compounds would not receive an INN if no commercial use is intended. In lieu of an INN, standard chemical nomenclature should be followed (see 14.9.1, Elements, or consult the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics...

Radiopharmaceutical Proprietary Names.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0062
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section
In proprietary names of radiopharmaceuticals, isotope numbers may appear in the same position as in the approved nonproprietary names, but they are usually joined to the rest of the name by a hyphen and are not necessarily preceded by the element symbol. Follow the USP Dictionary...

Radiopharmaceuticals.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0060
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section
The nomenclature for the isotopes incorporated in radiopharmaceuticals follows US adopted name (USAN, the US nomenclature agency) or INN (the international nomenclature agency) style. The USP Dictionary of USAN and International Drug Names 1 publishes USAN and INN, with USAN appearing in boldface type and INN in roman type. All USANs are reviewed by the INN Committee. The INN agent (if not intended to be marketed in the US) may not have a USAN. Almost all nomenclature is the same between the 2 groups. The single difference is stylistic. In INN style, the order is (1) name of the drug that contains the radioactive element, (2) isotope number, (3) element symbol, and (4) carrier name, if there is one. In USAN style, the order is (1) name of the drug that contains the radioactive element, (2) element symbol, (3) isotope number, and (4) carrier name, if there is one. In both, the isotope number appears as a superscript. The JAMA Network journals follow the INN style....

Uniform Labeling.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0063
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section
The abbreviation ul (for uniformly labeled) may be used without expansion in parentheses: [14C]glucose (ul) Similarly, terms such as carrier-free, no carrier added, and carrier added may be used. In general medical publications, these terms should be explained at first mention because not all readers will be familiar with them....

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