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Enzyme Nomenclature.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0069
Item type: 
section
Enzyme nomenclature was formalized in the 1950s.2 It is formulated by the International Union of Biochemistry (IUB) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), more specifically, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (NC-IUBMB) and the IUPAC-IUB Joint Commission on Biochemical Nomenclature, and “is probably the single largest task of the committee.”...

Molecular Medicine.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.021.0017
Item type: 
section
Molecules and their interactions underlie every area of medicine. Many classes of molecules are described according to rules or conventions, some of which are covered in other sections of this chapter. The Joint Commission on Biochemical Nomenclature formulates nomenclature policy for classes of biochemicals.1...

Molecular Terminology: Other Sections of Chapter 14.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0067
Item type: 
section
The following sections of chapter 14 have subsections on molecular terms: 14.2, Cancer; 14.3, Cardiology; and 14.11, Neurology. The following sections of chapter 14 substantially deal with molecular terminology: 14.1, Blood Groups, Platelet Antigens, and Granulocyte Antigens; 14.6, Genetics; 14.7, Hemostasis; and 14.8, Immunology. Table ...

Molecular Terms: Considerations and Examples.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0014.022.0068
Item type: 
section
Molecular terms often are more familiar in unexpanded form; their expansions may be obscure. Molecular terms often mix numbers, letters, and cases. They may be abbreviations or abbreviations within abbreviations (for instance, see TAF and subsequent entries in Table 14.10-2). Molecular terms differ from standard abbreviations, which typically are uppercase initialisms (eg, PVC for premature ventricular contraction). In contrast, many molecular terms are (or incorporate) contractions of single words, using all lowercase letters or mixing capital and lowercase letters (eg, apo for apolipoprotein; Hb for hemoglobin)....

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