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Abbreviations.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0135
Item type: 
section
Within the body of the table and in column and row headings, units of measure and numbers normally spelled out may be abbreviated for space considerations (see 13.12, Abbreviations, Units of Measure; 17.0, Units of Measure; and 18.0, Numbers and Percentages). However, spelled-out words should not be combined with abbreviations for units of measure. For example, “First Week” or “1st wk” or “Week 1” may be used as a column heading, but not “First wk.” Abbreviations or acronyms (but not abbreviations used to indicate units of measure) should be explained in a footnote (...

Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting Tables.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0138
Item type: 
section
Authors submitting tables in a scientific article should consult the publication’s instructions for authors for specific requirements and preferences regarding table format. Although details about preferred table construction vary among journals, several general guidelines apply. Each table should be created using the table functionality in the word processing software or spreadsheet program and inserted in the electronic manuscript file. Reduced type should not be used. For most journals, if a table is too large to be contained on 1 manuscript page, the table should be continued on another page with a “continued” line after the title on the subsequent page. Alternatively, if the table is large or exceedingly complex, the author should consider separating the data into 2 or more simpler tables. Tables should not be submitted on oversized paper, as a graphic image, or as photographic prints....

Numbers.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0136
Item type: 
section
Additional digits (including zeros) should not be added (eg, after the decimal point) to provide all data entries with the same number of digits. Doing so may indicate more precise results than actually were calculated or measured. A percentage or decimal quotient should contain no more than the number of digits in the denominator. For example, the percentage for the proportion 9 of 28 should be reported as 32% (or decimal quotient 0.32), not 32.1% (or 0.321) (...

Organizing Information in Tables.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0130
Item type: 
section
For a table to have maximum effectiveness, the information it contains must be arranged logically and clearly so that the reader can quickly understand the key point and find the specific data and comparisons of interest. During the planning and creation of a table, the author should consider the primary purpose of the table: what data need to be included, compared, or emphasized. ...

Punctuation.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0134
Item type: 
section
As with numbers and abbreviations, rules for punctuation may be less restrictive in tables to save space (see 8.0, Punctuation). For example, virgules may be used to present dates (eg, 4/02/17 for April 2, 2017) and hyphens may be used to present ranges (eg, 60-90 for 60 to 90) (...

Table Components.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0132
Item type: 
section
Formal tables in scientific articles conventionally contain 6 major elements: object identifier, title, column headings, stubs (row headings), body (data field) consisting of individual cells (data points), and footnotes (Table 4.1-1). Details pertaining to elements of style for table construction vary among publications; what follows is based on the general style of the JAMA Network journals....

Tables in Online Journals.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0131
Item type: 
section
For the JAMA Network journals online, tables appear as downloadable images, whereas other journals may use HTML tables for the online version of an article. The advantage of using tables that are images is that the table’s appearance, such as the design and data alignment, can be controlled and allows for consistent presentation of the data, which is an important consideration for larger, more complex tables. The use of HTML tables has its advantages as well, the first being that a graphic file need not be downloaded to view the table, making the data more immediately accessible on any electronic device (smartphone, tablet, or computer). In addition, the table’s text is searchable, and hyperlinks can be included within the table, such as reference citations that link to the reference in the list of all references at the end of the file or in a bibliography....

Tables That Contain Online-Only Supplementary Information.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0137
Item type: 
section
Tables that contain important supplementary information that is too extensive to be published in the journal article may be made available from other sources, including the journal’s website, or other means (eg, online database, institutional website). Online-only supplementary tables posted with an article on a journal’s website should undergo review because they are considered part of the article’s content....

Tables.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.021.0065
Item type: 
section
Because of their ability to present detailed information effectively and in ways that text alone cannot, tables are an essential component of many scientific articles. Tables can summarize, organize, and condense complex or detailed data and therefore are routinely used to present study results. The purpose of a table is to present data or information and support statements in the text. Information in the table must be accurate and consistent with that in the text in content and style. A properly designed and constructed table should be able to stand independently, without requiring undue reference to the text....

Types of Tables.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0129
Item type: 
section
A table displays information arranged in columns and rows (see 4.1.4, Table Components and Table 4.1-1) and is used most commonly to present numerical data. Each table should have an object identifier (eg, Table) and a title, be numbered consecutively as referred to in the text, and be positioned as closely as possible to its first mention in the text. Formal tables usually are framed by horizontal rules, boxes, or white space. Some journals add background shading....

Units of Measure.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0133
Item type: 
section
The JAMA Network journals report laboratory values in conventional units (see 13.12, Units of Measure, and 17.0, Units of Measure). In tables, units of measure, including the variability of the measurement, if reported, should follow a comma in the column or row heading: Age, mean (SD), y...

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