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Boxes.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0153
Item type: 
section
A textual table or box contains words, phrases, or sentences, often in list form. Boxes are used to emphasize key points, summarize information, and/or reduce the narrative text (Box 4.3-1). In this example, the box provides information in a list-type format, which allows for easier reading than the same content in prose form....
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Nontabular Material.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.021.0067
Item type: 
section
Nontabular material does not contain cells of individual data. Usually it is set off from the text by a box, rules, shading, or other elements. Sometimes the box or sidebar is cited in the text (following the citation rules for tables) and other times it is not. Any references that appear in nontabular material should also appear in the reference list and be numbered in order of their appearance (...

Sidebars.  

Stacy Christiansen and Connie Manno

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0004.022.0154
Item type: 
section
Sidebars typically contain supplementary information, including related topics or lists of sources for further reading (Box 4.3-2 and Box 4.3-3). They are often not called out in the text (eg, “Box 1”) but instead are placed within the article in a logical place for best comprehension....

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