You are looking at  1-20 of 117 chapters  for:

  • 5.0 Ethical and Legal Considerations x
Clear All

View:

Access to Data Requirement.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0194
Item type: 
section
For all reports, regardless of funding source, that contain original data (research and systematic reviews), at least 1 named author should indicate that she or he “had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis”...

Access to Data Statement.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0170
Item type: 
section
The ICMJE recommends that journals ask authors whether they “had access to the study data, with an explanation of the nature and extent of access, including whether access is on-going.”9 Consistent with this recommendation, the JAMA Network journals require at least 1 named author (eg, the principal investigator), and preferably no more than 2 authors, to indicate that she or he had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis for all reports that contain original data (eg, research articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses). This information should be published in the Acknowledgment section (...

Acknowledging Manuscript Receipt.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0241
Item type: 
section
Journals should send a notice to authors to acknowledge receipt of their manuscripts and provide names and contact information of relevant editorial staff. Acknowledgment letters may be sent automatically from manuscript submission systems, usually after an author has viewed the submission and confirmed that it is complete....

Acknowledging Support, Assistance, and Contributions of Those Who Are Not Authors.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0166
Item type: 
section
In the Acknowledgment, authors identify important sources of financial and material support and assistance and give credit to all persons who have made substantial contributions to the work but who are not authors.1 , 2 Contributions commonly recognized in the Acknowledgment section include the following:...

Acknowledgment Elements and Order of Elements.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0173
Item type: 
section
An example of the Acknowledgment section, including all possible elements, as it would appear in the JAMA Network journals is shown in Box 5.2-1. In print or PDF versions of journal articles, author affiliations and correspondence information typically are published on the title page (or first page) of an article. However, in some cases (eg, articles with lengthy abstracts and author bylines) and in some journals (due to design considerations), there may not be sufficient room for all this information, and it may be published in the Acknowledgment section at the end of the article with a note indicating such on the first page of the article. Online, the author information and Acknowledgment section usually appear at the end of the article before the reference list and may be hyperlinked from the list of authors at the beginning of the article. These sections have various names, such as Acknowledgment, Article Information, and Endnotes....

Acknowledgments.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.021.0076
Item type: 
section
If you wish your merit to be known, acknowledge that of other people. Proverb In scientific publication, Acknowledgments typically are used to list grant or funding support, donors of equipment or supplies, technical assistance, and important specific contributions from individuals who do not qualify for authorship (...

Advertisements, Advertorials, Sponsorship, Supplements, Reprints, and e-Prints.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.021.0086
Item type: 
section
Regardless of platform or format, the difference between editorial content and marketing messages should be clear to the average reader. American Society of Magazine Editors 1 Commercial activities, such as advertising, sponsorship, reprints, and e-prints, provide a major source of revenue for many scientific publications. With this revenue, publications can offset some of the costs of journal operations, production, and distribution; may be able to set lower subscription rates than would otherwise be possible; and can serve as a source of income for the journal’s owner. Thus, some editors and publishers consider advertising a financial necessity. From a financial perspective, generating revenue is an important goal of advertisers, publishers, and editors—advertisers want to sell more products, publishers want to increase journal revenue, and editors want their journals to remain financially viable and sustainable. However, editors have a larger ethical responsibility to their readers, who must be able to rely on the editor to ensure that the journal’s integrity remains intact and that the information contained in the publication is valid and objective. This responsibility includes ensuring that advertising does not influence editorial decisions or content and having policies and procedures in place that prevent such influence....

Advertisements.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0255
Item type: 
section
Advertisements appear in print and online journals, email alerts, other online products and services, apps, and other types of media (such as podcasts and blogs). For biomedical publications, advertisements typically include the following: ■ Advertisements that promote professional or trade-related products (primarily pharmaceuticals and medical equipment in biomedical publications), services, educational opportunities or products, or announcements (...

Advertising and Sponsorship in Online Publications.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0260
Item type: 
section
Online ads are not restricted by the physical limits of a printed page. For example, an advertiser or content user can increase the type size of the prescribing information that appears in small type in an online pharmaceutical ad. Ads can rotate, expand, be animated, or pop up on or float into a screen with or without the user’s initiated action. An ad for a particular drug, product, or service can be hyperlinked to the manufacturer or provider’s website. In addition, ads can be targeted for specific users or a specific user experience. Online publication and technologic innovation have challenged the traditional print-based standards that separate advertising and editorial content. However, the general principles for protecting editorial integrity of print publications apply to advertising in online publications and other electronic products, such as websites, email, audio and video recordings, apps, social media and blogs, and online databases, especially for publications in clinical and health-related fields....

Advertorials.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0257
Item type: 
section
An advertorial is an advertisement that imitates editorial content or presents content in an editorial-like format, such as using text, tables, or figures in a manner similar to the journal’s editorial content. During the early 1990s, following a decline in the biomedical advertising market, advertorials became more common. The ASME principles state: “Regardless of platform or format, the difference between editorial content and marketing messages should ...

Allegations Involving Manuscripts Under Editorial Consideration.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0188
Item type: 
section
In the case of a manuscript under consideration that is not yet published in which fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism is suspected, the editor should ask the corresponding author for a written explanation. If an explanation is not provided or is unsatisfactory, the editor should contact the author’s institutional authority (ie, dean, director, ethical conduct/research integrity officer) or governmental agency with jurisdiction to investigate allegations of scientific misconduct to request an investigation. In all such communications with authors and institutional authorities, the editor should take care to maintain confidentiality and should follow the same procedures described in ...

Allegations Involving Unresolved Questions of Scientific Misconduct.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0187
Item type: 
section
Cases may arise in which an allegation requires the journal editor to have access to the data on which the manuscript or article in question was based. Following the recommendations of the ICMJE, JAMA’s authorship statement includes the following language for all authors: I agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved; and...

Author Contributions.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0168
Item type: 
section
The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) encourages authors and journals to disclose authors’ individual contributions to the work reported in published articles.9 Following this and other recommendations, a number of journals publish lists of author contributions in the article’s Acknowledgment or Article Information section....

Author Disputes.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0162
Item type: 
section
Authorship disputes sometimes occur. For example, 10% of researchers who have received a grant from the US National Institutes of Health admitted to assigning authorship “inappropriately.”50 In surveys of plastic surgeon authors, 29% reported being involved in a dispute with a colleague over authorship issues in 2003, and 22% reported being involved in such disputes in 2011....

Authors’ Conflict of Interest Disclosures.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0169
Item type: 
section
Authors’ conflict of interest disclosure statements should be published with articles in a consistent manner.9 For example, some journals include authors’ conflict of interest disclosures in the Acknowledgment section at the end of the article. These journals require authors to include all potential conflicts of interest, including specific financial interests and relationships and affiliations (other than those affiliations listed on the title page of the manuscript) relevant to the subject of their manuscript, in the Acknowledgment section at the time the manuscript is submitted. Authors without conflicts of interest, including specific financial interests and relationships and affiliations relevant to the subject of their manuscript, should include a statement of no such conflicts of interests in the Acknowledgment section of the manuscript...

Authorship Responsibility.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.021.0075
Item type: 
section
Some judge of authors’ names, not works, and then Nor praise nor blame the writings, but the men. Alexander Pope 1 Nearly 70 years ago, Richard M. Hewitt, MD, then head of the Section of Publications at the Mayo Clinic, described the ethics of authorship in a ...

Authorship: Definition, Criteria, Contributions, and Requirements.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0155
Item type: 
section
Authorship offers significant professional and personal rewards, but these rewards are accompanied by substantial responsibility. During the 1980s, biomedical editors began requiring contributors to meet specific criteria for authorship. These criteria were first developed for medical journals under the initiative of Edward J. Huth, MD,...

Changes in Authorship.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0160
Item type: 
section
Changes made in authorship (ie, order, addition, and deletion of authors) should be discussed and approved by all authors.9 , 12 Any requests for changes in authorship after initial manuscript submission and before publication should be explained in writing to the editor in a letter signed by all authors, or if sent by email, all authors should be copied (ie, included as recipients of the email). ...

Confidentiality During Editorial Evaluation and Peer Review and After Publication.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0215
Item type: 
section
Strict confidentiality regarding the review and evaluation of submitted manuscripts, related content, and all relevant correspondence and other forms of communication is essential to the integrity of the editorial process (see 6.1, Editorial Assessment). Authors must feel free to submit manuscripts that contain their unique ideas and information that may affect their reputations or careers or that may be proprietary. Thus, editors and reviewers have an ethical duty to keep information about a manuscript confidential, and authors have a right to expect that confidentiality will be maintained....

Confidentiality in Allegations of Scientific Misconduct.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0216
Item type: 
section
Allegations of scientific misconduct (eg, fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism) must be considered carefully with regard to rules of confidentiality. In cases of credible allegations of such misconduct, an editor may need to disclose specific confidential information in a very controlled and limited manner.3 For example, after a credible allegation of scientific misconduct, an editor may need to contact an author’s or a reviewer’s relevant institutional, funding, or governmental authority (eg, an academic president, dean, or ethics/integrity officer) to request a formal investigation. In this situation, the editor will need to identify the person about whom the allegation was made. All communications regarding such allegations should be indicated as confidential. During such investigations, editors should avoid posting details, even if rendered anonymous, in email lists or blogs when seeking advice from colleagues. For more details on how an editor should handle such an allegation, ...

View: