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Modifying Gerunds.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0286
Item type: 
section
When a noun or pronoun precedes a gerund (a verb form ending in -ing that is used as a noun), the noun or pronoun is possessive (see 8.7, Apostrophe). The toxicity of the drug was not a factor in the patient’s dying so suddenly....

Nouns as Modifiers.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0285
Item type: 
section
Although nouns can be used as modifiers, overuse of noun modifiers can lead to a lack of clarity. Purists may demand stricter rules on usage, but, as with the use of nouns as verbs (see 11.4, Back-formations), the process of linguistic change is inevitable, and grammatical rigor must be tempered by judgment and common sense....
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Nouns.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.021.0128
Item type: 
section
Nouns (words that name a person, place, thing, or idea) may serve as subjects or objects. Nouns are classified as common, proper, or collective. Common nouns name something generic and are lowercased unless they appear at the beginning of a sentence or in a title....

Subject-Complement Agreement.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0287
Item type: 
section
Subjects and complements should agree in number. The boy can tie his own shoes. We asked trial participants to return their pill dispensers. However, when the complement is shared by all constituents of the plural subject, that noun remains singular. The authors were asked to revise their paper....

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