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Indefinite Pronouns.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0291
Item type: 
section
Indefinite pronouns refer to nonspecific persons or things. Most indefinite pronouns express the idea of quantity and share properties of collective nouns (see 7.5.5, Collective Nouns). Some indefinite pronouns (eg, any, each, either, neither, one, no one, everyone, someone, anybody, nobody, somebody) always take singular verbs; some (eg, ...

Personal Pronouns.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0289
Item type: 
section
Use the correct case of personal pronouns: subjective case (the pronoun is the subject of the phrase or clause) or objective case (the pronoun is the object of the phrase or clause). She was assigned to the active intervention group. (She is the subject.)...

Pronouns.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.021.0129
Item type: 
section
Pronouns replace nouns. In this replacement, the antecedent must be clear, and the pronoun must agree with the antecedent in number and gender. Note: The possessive pronoun its should not be confused with the contraction it’s (short for it is) (see 8.7.2, Apostrophe, Possessive Pronouns)....

Relative Pronouns.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0290
Item type: 
section
Relative pronouns (who, whom, whose, that, and which) introduce a qualifying clause. Who is used as a subject and whom as an object. The examples below illustrate correct usage. Give the award to whomever you prefer. [Objective case: whomever is the object of the verb ...

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