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Contractions.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0301
Item type: 
section
A contraction consists of 2 words combined by omitting 1 or more letters (eg, can’t, aren’t). An apostrophe shows where the omission has occurred. Contractions are usually avoided in formal writing. Previous | Next

Double Negatives.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0299
Item type: 
section
Two negatives used together in a sentence constitute a double negative. The use of a double negative to express a positive is acceptable, although it yields a weaker affirmative than the simpler positive and may be confusing: Our results are not inconsistent with the prior hypothesis....

Mood.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0297
Item type: 
section
Verbs may have 1 of 3 moods: (1) the indicative (the most common; used for ordinary objective statements), (2) the imperative (used for requesting or commanding), and (3) the subjunctive. Indicative verbs are used to state a fact, opinion, or question. The surgeon entered the room....

Split Infinitives and Verb Phrases.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0300
Item type: 
section
Infinitives are the basic form of verbs. In English, they are always a 2-word construction that starts with to (to read, to write, to live). Although some may still advise the avoidance of split infinitives (usually by insertion of an adverb, such as in the phrase “to quickly understand”), this proscription—likely a holdover from Latin grammar, wherein the infinitive is a single word and cannot be split—has been relaxed. In some cases, moreover, clarity is better served by the split infinitive....

Tense.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0298
Item type: 
section
Tense indicates the time relation of a verb: present (I am), past (I was), future (I will be), present perfect (I have been), past perfect (I had been), and future perfect (I will have been...
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Verbs.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.021.0131
Item type: 
section
Verbs express an action, an occurrence, or a mode of being. They have voice, mood, number, and tense (see 7.5, Subject-Verb Agreement). Previous | Next In the active voice, the subject does the acting; in the passive voice, the subject is acted on. In general, authors should use the active voice, except in instances in which the actor is unknown or the interest focuses on what is acted on (as in the following example of passive voice)....

Voice.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0296
Item type: 
section
In the active voice, the subject does the acting; in the passive voice, the subject is acted on. In general, authors should use the active voice, except in instances in which the actor is unknown or the interest focuses on what is acted on (as in the following example of passive voice)....

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