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Common Misperceptions About Sentence Beginnings and Endings.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0325
Item type: 
section
There are a number of mistaken caveats about sentence beginning and ending words. Two of the most common are the use of conjunctions to begin a sentence and the use of prepositions to end a sentence. The widely held belief that writers should not begin a sentence with a conjunction has no basis in formal English grammar....

Fragments.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0323
Item type: 
section
Sentence fragments, which lack a subject or a verb, should not be used in scientific or technical writing (except within the structured abstract; see 2.5, Abstract). Writers of prose and poetry occasionally use sentence fragments intentionally, for effect. Her affect signaled depression. Utter depression. In scientific writing, these fragments are likely to be unintentional and are inappropriate....

Run-ons.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.022.0324
Item type: 
section
Run-on sentences contain 2 (or more) independent clauses that run together without intervening punctuation or a coordinating conjunction. Run-on sentences are difficult to read and are not appropriate in scientific writing. Previous | Next
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Sentences.  

Stacy Christiansen

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th ed.)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0007.021.0135
Item type: 
section
A sentence must have, at minimum, a subject and a verb; it also usually contains modifiers. Previous | Next Sentence fragments, which lack a subject or a verb, should not be used in scientific or technical writing (except within the structured abstract; see 2.5, Abstract). Writers of prose and poetry occasionally use sentence fragments intentionally, for effect....

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