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  • 8.2 Comma, Semicolon, Colon. x
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Colon.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0338
Item type: 
section
The colon is the strongest of the 3 marks used to indicate a decided pause or break in thought. It separates 2 main clauses in which the second clause amplifies or explains the first. This dictum is often believed to be in the Hippocratic Oath: First, do no harm....
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Comma, Semicolon, Colon.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.021.0140
Item type: 
section
Commas, semicolons, and colons can be used to indicate a break or pause in thought, to set off material, or to introduce a new but connected thought. Each of these punctuation marks has specific uses, and the strength of the break in thought determines which mark is appropriate....
This content has an associated quiz

Comma.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0336
Item type: 
section
Commas are the least forceful of the 3 marks. Although comma usage sometimes is subjective, there are definite rules for using commas. Follow these rules unless overriding considerations (such as clarity) require otherwise. The comma is used to separate phrases, clauses, and groups of words and to clarify the grammatical structure and the intended meaning....

Semicolon.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0337
Item type: 
section
Semicolons represent a more definite break in thought than commas. Generally, semicolons are used to separate 2 independent clauses. Often a comma will suffice if sentences are short, but when the main clauses are long and joined by coordinating conjunctions or conjunctive adverbs, especially if 1 of the clauses has internal punctuation, use a semicolon....

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