You are looking at  1-7 of 7 chapters  for:

  • 5.8 Protecting Research Participants’ and Patients’ Rights in Scientific Publication. x
  • 5.0 Ethical and Legal Considerations x
Clear All

View:

Ethical Review of Studies and Informed Consent.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0220
Item type: 
section
To protect the safety and dignity of individuals who participate in research, academic institutions and funding agencies require any study that involves human participants be reviewed and approved by an IRB or independent ethics review committee. (Note: When referring to individuals who participate in studies, the word ...

Journal Policies and Procedures.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.1641
Item type: 
section
All journals should require authors of manuscripts that report studies that involve human participants to state explicitly in the Methods section of the manuscript that an appropriate independent ethics committee or IRB approved the study protocol or project or determined that the investigation was excluded or exempt from such approval and the reasons why. The name of the ethics committee(s) or IRB(s) should be specified in the Methods section. If the study protocol was approved by several ethics committees or IRBs, as might be expected in a study conducted in more than 1 country, it is appropriate to note that review and approval were conducted by the ethics committees or IRBs of all participating centers or institutions....

Patients’ Rights in Narrative Essays and News Reports in Biomedical Journals.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0223
Item type: 
section
Descriptions and photographs of individuals are often included in narrative essays and news stories in medical and health journals. However, if these descriptions or photographs identify patients or anyone in an actual patient-clinician encounter, the authors should be asked to deidentify those patients. Such deidentification should not include altering data or facts or presenting composites of multiple patients as a single case. Identifying details may be omitted but may not be altered or falsified. If patients cannot be deidentified, their written consent for publication must be obtained (...

Patients’ Rights in Social Media.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0224
Item type: 
section
Content published in journal-related social networking sites, blogs, and online discussion groups is subject to the same norms, standards, and regulations as is all other published and posted content. Thus, the principles described in 5.8.2 (Patients’ Rights to Privacy and Anonymity and Consent for Identifiable Publication) apply, and permission for publication is required from all identifiable patients and research participants in all posts about them in social networking sites, blogs, and online discussion groups....

Patients’ Rights to Privacy and Anonymity and Consent for Identifiable Publication.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0221
Item type: 
section
Privacy is a state or condition of limited access to matters of a personal nature, including but not limited to personal information about individuals, their bodies, their decisions, and their familial and intimate relations, as well as their right to control such access.37 When individuals grant others some form of access to themselves (eg, during a patient-clinician or participant-investigator encounter), they (patients and study participants) may allow limited intrusions in private matters but are not waiving all such rights. Thus, a loss of privacy depends on the kinds or amount of access, who has access, through what means, and pertaining to which aspect of a person’s identity....

Protecting Research Participants’ and Patients’ Rights in Scientific Publication.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.021.0082
Item type: 
section
An experiment is ethical or not at its inception; it does not become ethical post hoc—ends do not justify means. There is no ethical distinction between ends and means. Henry K. Beecher 1 Contemporary rules for protecting the rights of individuals (namely, research participants and patients) in scientific publication have their foundations in doctrines developed during the mid-20th century: the Nuremberg Code,...

Rights in Published Reports of Genetic Studies.  

Annette Flanagin

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0005.022.0222
Item type: 
section
The rules for ethical approval of studies and for obtaining informed consent also apply to genetic studies of family pedigrees and population-based samples. However, obtaining written consent for publication of identifiable information from all members of a large pedigree (many of whom may be deceased or unaware of the collection of family data) may be difficult or impossible. Proposals for obtaining some form of group consent and for avoiding the publication of information about identifiable family members who will not give their permission have been considered....

View: