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Avoidance of Ellipses in Tables.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0382
Item type: 
section
In tables, to avoid ambiguity, ellipses should not be used to indicate that no data were available or that a specific category of data is not applicable. Indicators such as NA (not available) or NR (not reported) should be used instead. Blank cells in a table also should be avoided unless the column heading does not apply to the entry or unless the entire section of the table does not contain data (...

Change in Capitalization.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0380
Item type: 
section
The first word after the end punctuation mark and the ellipses should use the original capitalization, particularly in legal and scholarly documents. This facilitates finding the material in the original source and avoids any change of meaning. If a change in the original capitalization is made, brackets should be used around the letter in question (...
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Ellipses.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.021.0146
Item type: 
section
Ellipses are 3 spaced dots (. . .) generally used to indicate omission of 1 or more words, lines, paragraphs, or data from quoted material (this omission being the ellipsis). Excerpts from the following paragraph will be used to demonstrate the use of ellipses. Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916) was a Danish artist best known for his somber, haunting interior scenes. A master of understatement, his best works are small interiors, often devoid of people. When human beings do appear, they often have their backs turned to the viewer and are apparently self-absorbed. Hammershøi’s art transformed his apartment into a continuum of unsettling empty spaces where time seems suspended; his works are not still life paintings but are intended to convey a mood, often a melancholy stillness. He does so by limiting his palette to umber, sienna, brown, black, and white and by excluding warmer tones. Hammershøi’s works are not naturalistic but, instead, reflect a mental climate without vitality and seem to speak to the loneliness and isolation of the individual....

Grammatically Incomplete Expressions.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0377
Item type: 
section
The sentence within which an ellipsis occurs should be a grammatically complete expression. However, ellipses with no period may be used at the end of a sentence fragment to indicate that it is purposely grammatically incomplete. Complete the sentence “When I retire, I plan to . . . ” in 20 words or less....

Omission at the End of a Sentence or Between Complete Sentences.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0376
Item type: 
section
If the ellipsis occurs at the end of a complete sentence or between 2 complete sentences, ellipses follow the final punctuation mark, the final punctuation mark being set close to the word preceding it, even when this word is not the final word in that sentence in the original....

Omission of Ellipses.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0381
Item type: 
section
Ellipses are not necessary at the beginning and end of a quotation if the quoted material is a complete sentence from the original. In a 2016 The Art of JAMA piece, Jeanette M. Smith, MD, wrote, “In Evening, a woman who has witnessed the ebb and flow of many seasons sits in peaceful repose by a window.”...

Omission Within a Sentence.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0375
Item type: 
section
If the ellipsis occurs within a sentence, ellipses represent the omission. When human beings do appear, they . . . are apparently self-absorbed. In some such instances, additional punctuation may be used on either side of the ellipses if it helps the sense of the sentence or better shows the omission....

Omissions Between or at the Start of Paragraphs.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0379
Item type: 
section
With material in which several paragraphs are being quoted and omissions of full paragraphs occur, a period and ellipses at the end of the paragraph preceding the omitted material are sufficient to indicate this omission. Indeed, it is no more than the just desert of Dr Theodore Schott and his late brother to attribute to them the credit of having introduced and elaborated a method capable of restoring most cases of heart disease to a state of complete compensation, after the failure of other means, such as digitalis. . . ....

Omissions in Verse.  

Cheryl Iverson

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0008.022.0378
Item type: 
section
Use 1 line of em-spaced dots to indicate omission of a full line or several consecutive lines of verse. Sometimes you say it’s smaller. Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . you said it was a touch larger, and would change. Marc Straus, MD, “Autumn” Previous | Next

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