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Eponymous vs Noneponymous Terms.  

Brenda Gregoline

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0015.021.0002
Item type: 
section
Use of eponyms in the biomedical literature should be considered with regard to their usefulness in transmitting medical information. Medical writing is replete with eponyms; however, descriptive terms are often more useful for a reader. For instance, the pancreatic duct is sometimes referred to as the duct of Wirsung, after its discoverer, but that term gives no useful information about the function or location of the duct. In any case, many eponyms can be replaced with a noneponymous term that consists of a descriptive word or phrase that designates the same disease, condition, or procedure. For example:...

Eponyms  

Brenda Gregoline

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
eISBN: 
9780197507827
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0015
Item type: 
chapter
ISBN: 
9780190246556
The Eponyms chapter of the 11th edition of the AMA Manual of Style addresses the use of eponymous vs noneponymous terms and, on the sometimes debated issue of the possessive vs ... More

Eponyms.  

Brenda Gregoline

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0015.021.0001
Item type: 
section
Eponyms are names or phrases derived from or including the name of a person or place. These terms are used in a descriptive or adjectival sense in medical and scientific writing to describe diseases, syndromes, signs, tests, methods, and procedures. Eponyms often indicate the name of the describer or presumptive discoverer of the disease (Alzheimer disease) or sign (Murphy sign), the name of a person or kindred found to have the disease described (Christmas disease), or, when based on the name of a place (technically called ...

Nonpossessive Form.  

Brenda Gregoline

in AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors (11th edn)

Print Publication Year: 
Feb 2020
Published Online: 
Feb 2020
DOI: 
10.1093/jama/9780190246556.003.0015.021.0003
Item type: 
section
There is some continuing debate about the use of the possessive form for eponyms, but a transition toward the nonpossessive form has taken place. A major step toward preference for the nonpossessive form occurred when the National Down Syndrome Society advocated the use of Down syndrome...

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